When to have cataract surgery

A cataract is defined as the clouding of the eye’s natural lens that lies behind both the iris and the pupil. They are the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40 and cataracts are the principal cause of blindness all over the world. In fact, according to Prevent Blindness America, there are more cases of cataracts in the world than there are of glaucoma, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy combined.

Cataract surgery is extremely successful in restoring vision and it is the most frequently performed surgery in the country. In fact, more than 3 million Americans undergo this procedure each year and nine out of 10 people who have cataract treatment regain excellent vision that is somewhere between 20/20 and 20/40.

However, when you begin to have symptoms, you may be able to improve your vision for a while by getting new glasses, including strong bifocals. You can also try magnification, appropriate lighting or other visual aids. You should begin to think about surgery when your cataracts have progressed enough to seriously impair your vision and affect your daily life.

Many people consider poor vision an inevitable fact of aging and cataracts are considered a normal part of the aging process. However, cataract surgery is a simple and relatively painless procedure that is used to regain vision. Therefore, patients should not be alarmed if they are told that they are developing cataracts because as people get older, the natural clear lens inside the eye tends to become progressively harder, darker, and cloudier. The result is referred to as a cataract. Cataracts tend to develop at different rates for different people. In addition, it is not uncommon for cataracts to develop at different times in the two eyes of the same person as it typically takes many years for the lens to become cloudy enough to impact one’s vision.

Moreover, there are many different types of cataracts that you can get. It depends on what area of the lens becomes cloudy. However, the typical cataract that is related to normal aging generally results in a uniform cloudiness that has a denser central core. It is often referred to as Nuclear Sclerosis. Other varieties of cataracts grow more quickly, are relatively uncommon, and often result from certain conditions other than typical aging. This includes Keratoconus treatment.

Additionally, a cataract should not be removed simply because it is present and if there are cataracts present in both eyes that require surgery, they are usually performed several weeks apart. This is due to the fact that cataract surgery on both eyes at the same time is not recommended because there is a possibility of complications, the most worrisome of which is an infection.

Your eye doctor is the only one who can diagnose and treat any problems you may be suffering from. In order to make an informed decision, it is best to discuss your options at your next appointment. This way you are sure that the benefits outweigh the risks.